Tomatoes in our space and outer space!


This was the first year I’ve tried my hand at “Heirloom” tomatoes. I don’t even know if I can call them that, as Heirloom is described in most places as “seeds passed down through generations”, and I just harvested my seeds last year, haha. At any rate, the idea of getting FREE seeds and using them to grow FREE food the following year really excites me. I know the word “sustainable” is overused too, but seriously, this is it!

In my usual completely un-fancy way, we took a few seeds out of some of our favourite tomatoes from last year, dried them on a paper towel, folded it up, put it in a baggy, labeled it, put it in the cupboard and promptly forgot about it.heirloom tomato seeds

AIMG_7196a few weeks ago, I tapped a few of the seeds just below the surface of some manure-y dirt and placed them in a sunny spot on my windowsill (my de facto greenhouse). Here is the result after a few weeks.
I was so excited something actually came up, although they sure don’t look like the tomato plants I usually buy (because they’re easy) and plant outside around this time.

Then, much to my delight, my youngest daughter arrives home from school with two tiny potted seedlings that look exactly like the ones growing on my windowsill and announces “these tomato plants were in outer space for 50 days!”

TomatosphereWith some prodding, I got some of the story of the project their school’s science classes are involved in, called Tomatosphere, which according to their website, “uses the excitement of space exploration to teach the skills and processes of scientific experimentation and inquiry. Students investigate the effects of the space environment on the growth of food that will inevitably support long-term human space travel.”

Apparently the seeds were distributed to about 18,000 classes in Canada and the US during the 2015-16 school year. They were launched to the International Space Station on April 14, 2015 and spent 5 weeks in space before returning to earth and being distributed to classrooms, along with a package of “placebo” seeds so students could compare the germination rates of the two groups of seeds. My daughter indicated the ones from space actually grew quicker. You can learn more about the program on the Tomatosphere site.

I’m hardening off our seedlings this week, and they’ll go in the garden along with the purchased plants which are much further along. Now, how to get them to grow quicker…..

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